Full-time Teacher, Part-time Goddess

September 14, 2021

Rigel Portales

229954981_972367696938655_5909213955497749281_n.jpg

I asked Mary Joyce Portales one question about her job as a teacher and minutes later, I had five different answers coupled with an abundance of her laughter. It’s no wonder that the 8 classes she handles, the security guards at her school, and even the principal call her Ma’am Dyosa (Goddess). 

Ma’am Dyosa is a secondary teacher and a coordinator of the Special Program in the Arts (SPA) at Infanta National Highschool, an institution with around 5,000 students and 200 teachers. From Monday to Friday, she provides online classes in theater and science for Grade 9 and 10 pupils. Every other week, she switches from streaming her lessons in an empty classroom to bringing her work home to her makeshift setup.

“Hiniram ko nga lang sa kuya ko ang ring light.” (I just borrowed the ring light from my older brother)

She tells me that managing online classes takes a lot of preparation. That’s why some of her co-teachers opted for modular learning classes where the work is simple but routinary: sorting, printing, and stapling modules. For her, paperwork is the worst part of being a teacher. She prefers creativity and spontaneity when it comes to forming her lesson plans. Some sections have groupworks while others have breakout rooms.

Her approach to conducting her lessons is guided by a philosophy she bases off her Science classes. “We have different DNA.” She says that students are diverse so their personalities shouldn’t be boxed in.

 

“Every time I teach a topic, I pretend it’s the first time.” It helps her handle all her sections on a case-by-case basis. One class had kids who didn’t like hearing or looking at themselves so she gave them puppet roleplay as an alternative. 

Adjusting to her pupils is warranted as she recounts the struggles these kids go through during the online setup. She mentions seeing two to three of them attending her class from their families’ storefront.

“Tumitingin na lang siya sa camera tas mamaya nagtitinda na siya, so natututo ka ba?!” (He/She would be looking at the camera then later on, he/she would be helping a customer, so are you really learning?!)

229954981_244676550839246_938713747086529435_n.png

Eventually, they had to drop out of school to pursue working full-time. Other kids would transition from online classes to modular classes because of depression, a lack of motivation and stable internet, or a desire for more personal time. Ma’am Dyosa explains that modules only take 1-2 days while online classes would force students to wake up early for the entire week. For her, these reasons should be taken seriously.

“Marami pa ring teacher hindi naniniwala na [nagsasabi] ‘Oo ang arte ng mga bata’... pero hindi talaga kasi nga ‘pag sa bahay, iba yung environment, ‘pag nakakalabas sila mas nakakapagexpress sila na—in a way therapy” (There are still many teachers that don’t believe who say “Yeah, kids are exaggerating it’... but that’s not true because when they’re at home, the environment is different, when they’re able to get out, they can express themselves in a way that’s therapeutic.)

Making the effort to know these things about the students she teaches is hard work in its own right. Interacting with students has become more difficult because of the pandemic which forced her to find other ways to make contact. She remembers messaging a former student, the brother of one of her current students, just to ask about how they’re doing at home.

Remini20210913131406843.JPG
Remini20210913132237159.JPG
234829392_1201512066994856_4866654303607863561_n.jpg

“Nasa kwarto niya lang po, nag-oonline class,” he replied. (He’s in his room doing online classes)

Not that helpful considering she noticed that this student had great grades during the first quarter that dropped to lines of 70 in the second which points to something else happening. Try as she might in these cases, the information isn’t enough and there are some that won’t show signs of improving due to things out of her control.

“Minsan hindi rin alam ng magulang ang dahilan kasi provided nalang, ayaw na lang talaga ng bata.” (Sometimes, the parents don’t know the reason because it’s already provided that the kid doesn’t want to.)

Only rarely does she ever get to confront students about personal matters: what troubled them, their interests, their friends in class—all of which could help her help them. At the very least, she makes sure she’s available for late night messages and consultations from her students. 

Interacting used to be easier back when face-to-face classes were still allowed. Ma’am Dyosa reminisced about setting up seat plans. The first quarter was by alphabetical order, the second had students choosing their own seats, and by the third or fourth, she would sneak some people next to their crushes. For her, gossip, jokes, and teasing weren’t only a way to connect with her students; it was also her favorite part of teaching.

“Nakakasakit sa ulo pero nakakamiss.” (It’s a pain but I miss it.)

Now, less than 50 students or around 2 sections attend her online sessions with the remaining students opting for modules. Ma’am Dyosa notes that modular learning is rife with its own issues. Learning modules given by the Department of Education (DepEd) arrived late or not at all on multiple occasions. During the first quarter, physical copies arrived on the third week which forced teachers to print the provided softcopies of the first two weeks for thousands of students. Although the second quarter was more punctual, the third quarter delivery followed suit with only worksheets and no modules. The inconsistency in support frustrated her to say the least.

The content within these learning materials were also lacking. In a module about genetics, general information and definitions were provided, however the step-by-step process of creating Punnett squares and examples of the procedure weren’t present. When the faculty of the school had decided to add information and questions to aid students, Ma’am Dyosa wholeheartedly did her best to fill in the gaps despite the extra work it posed. 

238523131_1114339655760888_6130362427630371290_n.jpg
Remini20210913132049276.JPG
233868523_1023975961475985_7491791393102814115_n.jpg
234770079_235645035119155_5935140705071557688_n.jpg
Remini20210913131640309.JPG

Furthermore, access to these modules remained troublesome at best. Instead of the ideal system proposed by Deped where schools deliver these modules to the students, Infanta National Highschool proposed a different system to accommodate the overwhelming number of their students. Learners were grouped according to their barangays and their parents would often be the one to go to school to pick up the modules. Throughout the previous points in our conversation, she was eager to point out the contradiction between the reality of education and the ideal which was pushed by DepEd.   

“May quality education ba yung pandemic? Parang hindi ko siya ma-claim. Nag-eefort naman halos lahat ng teacher…ay parang ang hirap nga niya iclaim dahil nga madaming struggles.” (Is there quality education during the pandemic? I can’t claim that. Almost all the teachers are making the effort but it’s still hard to claim because there are still so many struggles.)

Being a teacher is admittedly draining but for Ma’am Dyosa, a good support system has allowed her to recharge during the strain of online classes. A chismosa herself, she finds a sense of relief from the chismis and shenanigans that her co-teachers message online. 

“Uy daan tayo sa beach, malapit na ang recital,” her co-teachers joke. (Let’s drop by the beach, the recital is getting nearer after all.)

With 10 years of experience behind her infectious energy, she affirms that she won’t give up teaching during the pandemic as long as there are passionate students that need help. 

 

Recitals, reports, even editing the performances of her more artistic pupils, all is within a day’s work for Ma’am Dyosa. One might think she can do all things but in reality, she tells me that her students play a big part. By returning her efforts even during times of adversity, she finds a unique connection with them that makes being a full-time teacher worth it—maybe more than being a goddess. After all, when you speak her name, the Ma’am comes first, godhood comes second, and the smile it leaves you comes last.

 

Full-time Teacher, Part-time Goddess

September 14, 2021

Rigel Portales

Translated by Kathrine Anne Dizon

229954981_972367696938655_5909213955497749281_n.jpg

Tinanong ko si Mary Joyce Portales ng isang katanungan ukol sa kanyang trabaho bilang guro at ilang minuto pa lamang ang nakalipas, mayroon na akong limang magkakaibang mga sagot na kaakibat ng kasaganaan ng kanyang pagtawa. Hindi na nakakagulat na ang 8 klase na hinawakan niya, ang mga security guard sa kanyang paaralan, at kahit ang punong-guro ay tinawag siyang Ma’am Dyosa.

Si Ma'am Dyosa ay isang guro ng sekondarya at tagapag-ugnay ng Special Program in the Arts (SPA) sa Infanta National High School, isang institusyon na may halos 5,000 na mga mag-aaral at 200 na guro. Mula Lunes hanggang Biyernes, nagbibigay siya ng mga klase sa online sa teatro at science para sa mga mag-aaral sa Baitang 9 at 10. Tuwing iba pang linggo, lilipat siya mula sa pag-stream ng kanyang mga aralin sa isang walang laman na silid aralan hanggang sa maiuwi ang kanyang trabaho sa kanyang pansamantalang setup.

“Hiniram ko nga lang sa kuya ko ang ring light.”

Sinabi niya sa akin na ang pamamahala sa mga klase sa online class ay nangangailangan ng masusing paghahanda. Iyon ang dahilan kung bakit ang ilan sa kanyang mga kapwa-guro ay nagpasyang modular learning ang mga klase kung saan ang gawain ay madali ngunit nakagawian na: pag-uuri, pag-print, at stapling module. Para sa kanya, ang gawaing papel ay ang pinakapangit na bahagi ng pagiging isang guro. Mas gusto niya ang pagkamalikhain at kusang-loob pagdating sa pagbuo ng kanyang mga plano sa aralin. Ang ilang mga seksyon ay may mga groupworks habang ang iba ay may mga breakout room.

Ang kanyang diskarte sa pagsasagawa ng kanyang mga aralin ay nakabatay sa isang pilosopiya na mula sa kanyang klase sa Science. "Iba-iba tayong DNA." Sinabi niya na ang mga mag-aaral ay magka-iba kaya ang kanilang mga personalidad ay hindi dapat itago.

 

"Sa tuwing nagtuturo ako ng isang paksa, nagpapanggap ako na ito ang unang pagkakataon." Tinutulungan siya nitong hawakan ang lahat ng kanyang mga seksyon na para bang iba-iba silang paksa. Ang isang klase niya ay may mga bata na hindi gusto na naririnig o nakikita nila ang kanilang sarili kaya binigyan niya sila ng mala-papet na aktibidad bilang isang kahalili.

Ang pag-aayos niya sa kanyang sarili para sa kanyang mga mag-aaral ay hindi makaka-ila habang isinalaysay niya ang mga pinagdadaanan ng mga bata sa online setup. Nabanggit niya na dalawa hanggang tatlo sa kanyang mga estudyante ay pumasok habang nasa tindahan ng kanilang pamilya.

“Tumitingin na lang siya sa camera tas mamaya nagtitinda na siya, so natututo ka ba?!”

Hindi nagtagal, kailangan nilang huminto sa pag-aaral upang ipagpatuloy ang pagtatrabaho ng buong-oras. Ang ibang mga bata ay lumipat mula sa mga online na klase papunta sa mga modular na lamang na klase dahil sa madalas na pagkalungkot, kawalan ng gana at stable na internet, o pagnanais para sa mas maraming oras para sa sarili. Ipinaliwanag ni Ma'am Dyosa na ang mga module ay tumatagal lamang ng 1-2 na araw samantalang  ang online na klase ay pine-pwersa ang mga estudyante na magising nang maaga upang pumasok sa buong linggo. Para sa kanya, ang mga kadahilanang ito ay dapat seryosohin.

“Marami pa ring teacher hindi naniniwala na [nagsasabi] ‘Oo ang arte ng mga bata’... pero hindi talaga kasi nga ‘pag sa bahay, iba yung environment, ‘pag nakakalabas sila mas nakakapagexpress sila na—in a way therapy”

Ang pagsisikap na malaman ang mga bagay na ito tungkol sa kanyang mga mag-aaral na kanyang tinuturo ay mahirap na para sa kanyang sarili. Ang pakikipag-ugnayan sa kanyang mga mag-aaral ay naging mas mahirap dahil sa pandemik na pinilit siyang maghanap ng iba pang mga paraan upang makipag-ugnay lamang. Naaalala niya ang pag mensahe ng isang dating mag-aaral, ang kapatid ng isa sa kanyang kasalukuyang estudyante, upang magtanong lamang kung kumusta sila sa bahay.

229954981_244676550839246_938713747086529435_n.png
Remini20210913131406843.JPG
Remini20210913132237159.JPG
234829392_1201512066994856_4866654303607863561_n.jpg

“Nasa kwarto niya lang po, nag-o-online class,” tugon niya.

Hindi masyadong nakumbinsi si Ma’am Dyosa sapagkat napansin niya na ang mag-aaral na ito ay may mataas na mga marka sa first quarter  ng kanilang edukasyon na bumaba kung saan umabot na sa 70, ibig sabihin ay may iba nang nangyayari sa kanila. Subukan niya man ang lahat, hindi sapat ang impormasyon at may ilang hindi nagpapakita ng mga pagpapabuti sa sarili dahil sa mga bagay na wala sa kanyang kontrol.

“Minsan hindi rin alam ng magulang ang dahilan kasi provided nalang, ayaw na lang talaga ng bata.” 

Minsan na lamang niyang makaharap ang kanyang mga mag-aaral tungkol sa mga personal na bagay: kung ano ang gumugulo sa kanila, kanilang mga interes, kanilang mga kaibigan sa klase — lahat ng bagay na maaaring makatulong sa kanya na tulungan sila. Basta, tinitiyak niya na nariyan siya kahit gabi para sa mga gustong mag mensahe o  kumonsulta mula sa kanyang mga mag-aaral.

Ang pakikisalamuha dati noong face-to-face classes ay mas madali kaysa ngayon. Naalala pa nga ni Ma’am Dyosa ang tungkol sa pag-aayos ng mga seat plans. Ang first quarter ay sa pamamagitan ng pagkakasunod-sunod ng apelyido, ang second quarter ay binigyan niya ng tsansa ang mga mag-aaral na pumili ng kanilang sariling mga upuan, at sa third at  fourth quarter, tuksuhin niya pa ang ilan na itabi sa kanilang mga hinahangaan. Para sa kanya, ang tsismis, biro, at panunukso ay hindi lamang isang paraan upang kumonekta sa kanyang mga mag-aaral; ito rin ang paborito niyang bahagi ng pagtuturo.

“Nakakasakit sa ulo pero nakakamiss.”

Ngayon, bumaba sa 50 mag-aaral o halos 2 seksyon na lamang ang dumadalo sa kanyang mga online session kung saan ang iba ay pinipili na lamang ang module. Sinabi ni Ma'am Dyosa na ang modular na pag-aaral ay may kaakibat na mga isyu. Ang mga module na ibinigay ng Department of Education (DepEd) ay kadalasang huli na dumating o hindi talaga kadalasan. Sa first quarter, dumating na lamang ang mga pisikal na kopya sa ikatlong linggo kung saan napilitan ang mga guro na i-print ang ibinigay na mga kopya sa unang dalawang linggo ng klase para sa libu-libong mga mag-aaral. Bagaman ang second quarter ay mas mas maagang dumating, ang paghahatid ng para sa third quarter ay halos mga worksheet lamang at walang mga module. Ang nakakapanlumong suportang binigay ay ang nagpabigo sa kanya.

Kulang din ang nilalaman sa loob ng mga materyales na binibigay sa kanila. Sa isang module ukol sa genetics, ang pangkalahatang impormasyon at mga kahulugan ay ibinigay, subalit ang sunud-sunod na proseso ng Punnett Squares at mga halimbawa ng pamamaraan ay wala. Nang magpasya ang guro ng paaralan na magdagdag ng impormasyon at mga katanungan upang matulungan ang mga mag-aaral, buong pusong ginawa ni Ma'am Dyosa ang lahat upang mapunan ang mga puwang sa kabila ng labis na gawaing ipinataw nito.

238523131_1114339655760888_6130362427630371290_n.jpg
Remini20210913132049276.JPG
233868523_1023975961475985_7491791393102814115_n.jpg
234770079_235645035119155_5935140705071557688_n.jpg
Remini20210913131640309.JPG

Bukod dito, ang pagkalap sa mga module ay nanatiling mahirap.. Sa halip na ang perpektong sistema na iminungkahi ng DepEd kung saan ihahatid ng mga paaralan ang mga module na ito sa mga mag-aaral, ang Infanta National High School ay nagmungkahi pa ng kalakip na sistema upang mabigyan ang napakaraming bilang ng kanilang mga mag-aaral.

“May quality education ba yung pandemic? Parang hindi ko siya ma-claim. Nag-eeffort naman halos lahat ng teacher… ay parang ang hirap nga niya i-claim dahil nga madaming struggles.”

Ang pagiging isang guro ay nakakaubos ng enerhiya ngunit para kay Ma'am Dyosa, suporta galing sa iba lamang ang nakakatulong sa kanya upang ibalik ang nawalang enerhiya. Dahil isa rin siya sa mga chismosa, nakakakuha siya ng sense of relief mula sa mga chismis ng kanyang nakakalap mula sa mga kapwa-guro online.

 

“Uy daan tayo sa beach, malapit na ang recital,” biro ng kapwa-guro niya.

Sa 10 taong karanasan sa likod ng kanyang nakakahawang enerhiya, pinatunayan niya na hindi siya susuko sa pagtuturo sa panahon ng pandemya hangga't may mga determinadong mag-aaral na nangangailangan ng tulong.

 

Lahat ng mga recital, ulat, kahit na ang pag-edit ng mga gawa ng kanyang mga mag-aaral, lahat ay nasa loob ng isang araw na trabaho para kay Ma'am Dyosa. Maaaring isipin ng lahat na kaya niyang gawin ang lahat ng bagay ngunit sa totoo lang, sinabi niya sa akin na ang kanyang mga mag-aaral ay may malaking bahagi sa kanyang rason. Sa pamamagitan ng pagsisikap kahit sa mga oras ng paghihirap, nakikita niya ang natatanging koneksyon na meron sila ng kanyang mga mag-aaral na nakakatulong sa pagiging isang guro - mas higit pa sa pagiging isang dyosa. Pagkatapos ng lahat, kapag sinabi mo ang kanyang pangalan, ang Ma'am ay nauuna, ang pagka-diyosa ay pumapangalawa, at ang ngiting naiwan ay ang huli.