PAGASA Ph : Katrina Santiago

 

September 15, 2020

DongWon Kim

In these times when unrest is rampaging through the Philippines in the form of socioeconomic divides and political unrest, fear can strike hardest. Katrina Santiago finds herself in the middle of that fear, deeply affected but unshaken by the uncertainties that surround her. Katrina is a writer, critic, and the founder of PAGASA (People for Accountable Governance and Sustainable Action), a civil society organization that raises funds to deliver survival packs for families in the communities that have lost their means of livelihood. Currently, more than 200 volunteers have committed to the organization. PAGASA has also been informing the public about urgent issues sprouting from the current government on its social media accounts. Katrina works with many people, mainly with her friends Anina, Kiesha, CJ, Leslie.

pagasa 2.jpg
pagasa 3.jpg

Katrina’s first step toward PAGASA was in March when it became clear to her that people were going hungry from the lack of community food provisions during the first week of lockdown. She started thinking about bringing survival packs to communities. Her friend CJ, who works with activist organizations, guided the project with her and put together a survival pack costing each donor 700 pesos. Katrina’s friend Leslie, who worked with an NGO suggested that she put her face and name on PAGASA so that it could look more trustworthy. Katrina was uncertain but still thought there was no better time than now to put her face on something. “PAGASA, as a term and as a concept was something that I already had around Feb 2019 and the whole idea of, people for accountable governance and sustainable action, was really already about trying to deal with just the amount of disinformation we were facing at that time so close to the elections,” Katrina elaborated. “First we want to hold the government accountable and the only way we could do that is if we agree on the same information that matters because even in 2019 that was already my premise for PAGASA.”

But putting her face on the organization was emotionally challenging for Katrina. At first, her thoughts were dominated by worry and doubt. She knew revealing her identity was a risky move, especially since PAGASA not only distributed survival packs but also addressed political issues and called for accountable governance. “The final push might’ve been how bad things were all the time . . . We would receive so many stories about how terrible things were and it has allowed me to rationalize the fear,” said Katrina.

 

“I needed to put my face on it. I needed to put my name on it . . . It’s also scarier because it’s me and my face, but it was a risk I needed to take in order for us to continue doing this.” Katrina knew that her credibility as a writer helped the organization, rooting trust and confidence in the donors. Another thing she feared was the thought that the organization would not be able to move forward, even with the use of social media. “I was so afraid that it would just get eaten up,” Katrina said, recalling one of PAGASA’s first posts. But to her surprise, the social media posts started moving up. People started sending PAGASA money and the team was able to start moving very quickly and efficiently. Due to the donations poured in by generous people and groups, such as the Bad Cafe, Kunwari Veggies for Good, and Gising Gising (PAGASA was able to quickly start distributing survival packs and meals in a sustainable way. Katrina’s resilience is an outstanding example that conquering fear and facing doubts head on is a way to cultivate hope and rise from emotional restraints.

90497810_3217401314936686_31340251418313
PWDs_Martinez Tiblao Antique_48.jpg

When the PAGASA Instagram and Facebook accounts started receiving lots of attention, Katrina took the opportunity to talk about issues that made people vulnerable. “So if we’re distributing to a community in Caloocan, a community where ECQ mothers live in fear, I want to talk about that. I want to remind people that these women have survived losing husbands, losing sons,” said Katrina. “The women live in fear every day and yet, in a time of crisis, they’re thinking about how they can help the communities. I want to talk about how in Tandog where we’re all on lockdown there was a huge fire and a whole community lost everything and yet the nanays decided that they would build a kitchen and they would start feeding the community that was living in the covered parts.” Katrina felt like it was important to be telling these stories instead of just giving people numbers.

 

She felt the risk of doing so, sometimes wondering if people would think that PAGASA was politicizing their work. At the same time, she realized that feeding people is a political act. She could have just been a person who decided to ignore the needy during the pandemic, but she felt that it was her civic duty to talk about surfacing issues, and if she could do that through the task of helping people survive the pandemic, then that was even better. 

When the Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020 was passed in July, Katrina could not refrain from talking about it on the media platform. She felt like the bill was a monumental issue because it would affect everyone. Back then, she knew that if the organization went in the direction of addressing the bill, they would be tagged as leftists. But the fear didn't hold her back from moving forward with her vision—  Katrina realized that there were enough people speaking out. “Being tagged as a leftist at this point means nothing when the government is afraid of everyone,” she reasoned. PAGASA set to work, delivering the same information about the political issues but in the tone and manner that would encourage people to talk more, regardless of whether it was left or liberal. Still, Katrina’s main worries nowadays are Duterte and the police. “I think fear is our greatest adversity. It’s become more and more palpable.”

17Drivers15.jpg
PWDs_Martinez Tiblao Antique_54.jpg

to learn more about PAGASA PH and support their advocacies, follow them on Instagram, @pagasa.ph and Facebook, Pagasa Ph

Katrina views PAGASA’s movement as an awakening for younger generations. In the long-term she wants PAGASA to become a group that will galvanize the younger generations around the issues of the nation. Unlike her parents, who had to fight for democracy, Katrina’s generation was born with freedom. She wants PAGASA to be a movement that shows people that it is the time to defend that freedom.

 

“That will be the greatest achievement of all because no one else is going to do this for us at this point and the political divides are so clear that it’s also paralyzing but we shouldn’t be paralyzed,” Katrina said, later adding how uniting together will create hope. She believes that hopelessness isn't an option, and wants PAGASA to be a place where people are encouraged to demand better from their leaders, and give them hope for building a better government. “If PAGASA can be a platform where we can give people that kind of direction, that would be fantastic,” said Katrina.

 

“When people ask me what is the one thing about PAGASA that I would want to talk about, it would always be hope. It’s called PAGASA because I’m a critic by profession and criticism is an act of hope.” Katrina believes that if people talk about an issue, then they can solve it. She views criticism of the government as an act of hope, always presuming that there is someone in the government who wants to change things. Katrina has a strong idea of where PAGASA will be directed in the future. “I feel like we should be able to continue to work with what we want to do, in terms of disseminating information and organizing a movement around these issues.” Her vision for the organization has never faltered. PAGASA will continue to serve the Filipino communities by providing basic necessities and raising awareness about what makes them vulnerable. She plans to stand with her people in solidarity, turning fear into hope and hope into change.

 

PAGASA Ph : Katrina Santiago

Ika-15 ng Setyembre, 2020

DongWon Kim

Translated by Martina Go

Sa kasalukuyan kung saan ang kabalisahan ay tuluyang lumalaganap sa Pilipinas sa anyo ng mga pagkakaiba ng kalagayang panlipunan at ligalig sa pampulitikong pangyayari, nangingibabaw ang takot. Natagpuan ni Katrina Santiago ang kanyang sarili sa kalagitnaan ng katakutang ito, apektado ngunit hindi nayayanig sa harap ng kawalan ng katiyakan na pumapaligid sa kanya. Si Katrina ay isang manunulat, kritiko, at siyang nagpasimuno ng PAGASA (People for Accountable Governance and Sustainable Action), isang samahang sibil na ang hangarin ay ang lumikom ng pera upang mabigyan ng mga survival packs ang mga pamilya na galing sa mga komunidad na nawalan ng pangkabuhayan dahil sa pandemya. Ngayon, higit  sa 200 na mga boluntaryo ang kasapi ng samahan, namimigay ng mga pakete at namamahala ng tatlong karenderya sa lungsod  ng Quezon City. Ang PAGASA ay nagpapahayag din sa masa tungkol sa mga agarang isyu na sumisibol mula sa kasalukuyang administrasyon gamit ang social media. Kasama ni Katrina ang kanyang mga kaibigan na sina Anina, Kiesha, CJ, at Leslie sa adhikaing ito.

pagasa 2.jpg
pagasa 3.jpg

Ang unang hakbang ni Katrina upang mabuo ang PAGASA ay nagsimula noong buwan ng Marso nang mas naging malinaw sa kanya ang pangangailangan ng mga tao mula sa kakulangan ng probisyong pagkain pang-komunidad noong unang linggo ng lockdown. Naisipan ni Katrina na mamigay ng mga “survival packs” sa mga komunidad na ito. Ang kanyang kaibigan na si CJ, na nagtatrabaho para sa mga nakakubling organizasyong pang-aktibista, ay ang gumabay sa proyektong ito at siya rin ang naglikom ng mga gamit pang-survival pack na naghahalagang 700 pesos. Si Leslie naman, isa pang kaibigan na nagtratrabo sa isang NGO, ay nagmungkahi kay Katrina na ilagay ang kanyang imahe at pangalan sa PAGASA upang ito ay magmukhang mas katiwa-tiwala. Hindi man sigurado si Katrina sa payong ito, bagkus naisip nalang niya na ito ay ang pinaka mabuting pagkakataong mailagay niya ang kanyang mukha sa isang proyekto. “Ang PAGASA ay isang konseptong nabuo noong 2019 Pebrero, at ang buong ideya na ang gobyerno natin ay may pananagutan sa kanyang mga mamamayan kaakibat ang aksyong pangmatagalan. Ito ay nabuo noong malapit na ang eleksyon upang harapin ang lumalaganap na peke na impormasyon,” paliwanag ni Katrina. “Una sa lahat gusto naming magkaroon ng pananagutan ang gobyerno at makakamtan lang namin ito sa paraan ng pagkakasundo sa mahahalagang impormasyon dahil mula noong 2019 ito na ang ipinaglalaban ng PAGASA.”

Ngunit ang pagpapakita ng kanyang mukha sa organizasyon ay naging malaking hamon sa kanyang emosyon.  Noong simula, ang kanyang isipan ay napuno ng pagkabalisa at pagdududa. Alam niya na ang pag hayag ng kanyang pagkatao ay isang mapanganib na gawain, dahil ang PAGASA ay hindi lamang nagbibigay ng survival packs ngunit ito’y nagbibigay pansin sa mga isyung pampulitika at tumatawag para sa pananagutan ng ating gobyerno. “Ang huling nang-udyok sa akin ay kung gaano na kasama ang kalagayan noong panahong iyon,  marami kaming naririnig na mga kwento tungkol sa mga katiwalian at masasamang pangyayari at ito ay ang naging rason para maisakatwiran ko ang pangambang ito,” sabi ni Katrina.

“Kinailangan kong ilagay ang aking mukha at pangalan sa harap nito. Nakakatakot pero ito ay isang peligro na kailangan kong harapin upang maipagpatuloy ang organisasyong ito.” Alam din ni Katrina na ang kanyang kredibilidad bilang isang manunulat ay ang nakatulong sa organisasyon upang mapagkatiwalaan ng mga donor. Isa pang kinatatakutan ni Katrina ay ang baka hindi umusbong ang organisasyon kahit na sila ay magiging aktibo sa social media. “Natakot ako na ito ay hindi mabigyang pansin” naalala ni Katrina yung kauna-unahang post ng PAGASA. Subalit laking gulat niya na nabigyan pansin ang kanilang mga posts sa social media. Nagsimulang magpadala ng pera ang mga taong mapagbigay at ang mga organisasyong kagaya ng Bad Cafe, Kunwari Veggies for Good, at Gising Gising. Agad-agad na nasimulan ng PAGASA ang pamimigay ng mga survival packs sa paraang pangmatagalan. Ang pagiging matatag ni Katrina ay isang kapuri-puring halimbawa, na ang matagumpayan ang takot at harapin ng buong puso ang pag-aalinlangan ay isang pamamaraan upang magpasibol ng pag-asa at bumangon muli mula sa mga hamong emosyonal. 

90497810_3217401314936686_31340251418313
PWDs_Martinez Tiblao Antique_48.jpg

Noong dumami ang nagbibigay pansin sa  Instagram at Facebook ng PAGASA, ginamit ni Katrina ang oportunidad na ito upang mapag-usapan ang mga isyung nakakaapekto sa mga tao. “Tuwing kami ay namimigay sa isang komunidad gusto kong pag-usapan ang mga pinagdaanan ng mga tao na aming tinutulungan. Kagaya ng isang pamayanan sa Caloocan kung saan ang mga “nanay ng ECQ” (ECQ mothers) ay naninirahan sa takot, gusto kong pag-usapan yan. Gusto kong ipaalala sa mga tao na ang mga kababaihang ito ay nagpatuloy kahit namatayan sila ng mga asawa at anak,” ipinaliwanag ni Katrina. “Ang mga kababaihang ito ay natatakot araw-araw ngunit, sa gitna ng krisis, pinag-iisipan nila kung papaano sila makatutulong sa iba’t ibang pamayanan. Gusto ko ring pag-usapan ang nangyari sa Tandog kung saan, sa gitna ng lockdown, sila’y nasunugan at nawala sa kanila ang lahat, ngunit ang mga nanay ay nagsimula ng isang kusina upang mapakain ang mga komunidad na nakatago.” Naramdaman ni Katrina ang kahalagahan na maipahayag ang mga kwentong ito sa halip na bigyan lamang niya ng mga numero ang mga tao.

Subalit,  nag-aalala si Katrina na maaaring isipin ng mga tao na ginagawa niyang usapang pulitika ang mga proyekto ng PAGASA. Pero sa paniniwala ni Katrina, ang pagtulong at pagpapakain sa mga mahihirap ay isang gawaing pampulitika. Maari namang wala siyang pakialam sa mga pangangailangan ng mamamayang Pilipino sa gitna ng pandemya, ngunit naramdaman niya na ang pagbibigay pansin sa mga isyung panglipunan ay ang kanyang tungkulin bilang isang Pilipino at kung magagawa niya ito habang tumutulong sa mga tao sa panahon ng pandemya, ito ay mas mabuti.

Nang biglang ipasa ang Anti-Terrorism Act of 2020 noong buwan ng Hulyo, hindi matiis ni Katrina ang matinding pangangailangan na pag-usapan ito sa kanyang plataporma sa PAGASA. Naisip ni Katrina na ang pagpasa ng batas na ito ay isang malaking problema na makakaapekto sa lahat ng mga tumutulong sa mahihirap, nagpapahayag ng kanilang saloobin, at nagsusulat para sa organisasyon.  Alam niya na maaaring matatak na “leftist” ang organisasyon kapag pinag-usapan nila ang batas na ito. Sa kabila ng pagkatakot ay hindi tumigil sa pagpupursige  si  Katrina patungo sa kanyang inaasahan --- napagtanto niya na maraming tao ang naglalakas boses laban sa batas na ito. “Walang nang punto ang pagkakakilala bilang isang leftist sa panahong ito kung takot ang gobyerno sa lahat ng mga nakikibaka,” ang naging dahilan ni Katrina. Nagsimula ang trabaho sa PAGASA na magbigay impormasyon tungkol sa mga isyung pulitikal na nanghihikayat sa masa na huwag matakot na matawag na leftist o liberal dahil lamang sa pagbibigay nila ng opinyon tungkol sa isyu na ito. Hanggang ngayon, ang tanging inaalala ni Katrina ay ang pangulong Duterte at ang mga pulis. “Ang ating pinakamalaking balakid ay ang takot na mas nararamdaman sa kasalukuyang panahon.”

17Drivers15.jpg
PWDs_Martinez Tiblao Antique_54.jpg

Para matutunan at suportahan ang adbokasiya ng PAGASA PH, i-follow sila sa Instagram: @pagasa.ph and Facebook, Pagasa Ph

Sa pananaw ni Katrina,ang adhikain ng PAGASA ay gisingin ang mga kabataan. Umaasa siya na ang PAGASA ay maging isang grupo na magbibigay kahalagahan ang mga isyu ng ating bansa. Hindi kagaya ng nakaraang henerasyon na kinailangan pa nilang ipaglaban ang demokrasya, ipinanganak si Katrina sa isang henerasyon kung kailan ito ay natatag na. Gusto niya na ang PAGASA ay maging isang kilusan na magmumulat sa kasalukuyang henerasyon na panahon na para ipagtanggol ang demokrasyang ipinaglaban ng  mga nauna sa atin.

 

“That will be the greatest achievement of all because no one else is going to do this for us at this point and the political divides are so clear that it’s also paralyzing but we shouldn’t be paralyzed,” Katrina said, later adding how uniting together will create hope. She believes that hopelessness isn't an option, and wants PAGASA to be a place where people are encouraged to demand better from their leaders, and give them hope for building a better government. “If PAGASA can be a platform where we can give people that kind of direction, that would be fantastic,” said Katrina.

“Iyon ang magiging pinakamalaking karangalan dahil hindi ito magagawa ng sinoman kundi tayo. Napakalaki na ng pagkakaiba-iba ng mga opinyon ng mga tao sa usaping pampulitika na  naging sanhi ng pakaparalisa. Ngunit, hindi tayo dapat maparalisa,” sabi ni Katrina,   at kanyang idinagdag,   na ang pagkakaisa ng mga Pilipino ay ang magdadala ng pag-asa. Siya ay naniniwala na hindi ito ang panahanon para mawalan ng pag-asa. Umaasa si Katrina na ang organisasyon niya ay magiging isang lugar kung saan mahihikayat ang mga taong maghangad ng mas mabuting  liderato at makapagbigay ng pag-asa upang makabuo ng mas maayos na gobyerno. 

“Mabuti nga sana kung ang PAGASA ay makakapag-gabay sa mga tao patungo sa ganitong klase ng pag-iisip.” Naniniwala si Katrina na mabibigyan ng solusyon ang isang problema kung ito ay pinagag-uusapan ng mga tao. Ang pagpuna sa mga problema ng gobyerno ay maaaring magdala ng pag-asa, kung mayroon mang kahit isang tao na namumuno na makikinig at magnanais na  pagbutihin ang kasalukuyang administrasyon. Napag-isipan na rin ni Katrina kung saan patungo ang PAGASA sa darating na panahon. “Kailangan naming ipagpatuloy ang pag bahagi ng tamang impormasyon at ang pag-oorganisa ng mga gawaing tumutulong dito.” Ang kanyang pananaw para sa organisasyon ay hindi kailanman nayanig. Ang PAGASA ay tuluyang maglilingkod sa iba’t ibang komunidad sa pamamaraan ng pamimigay ng pangkaraniwang pangangailangan at pagbigay boses sa kanilang mga kwento. Nais ni Katrina na tumayo kasama ang kanyang mga kapwa Pilipino sa pakakaisa, para baguhin ang takot sa pag-asa at ang pag-asa sa pagbabago.