Reclaiming Resilience: The Case for Disaster Justice in the Philippines

August 2, 2022

JS Vitor

The rainy season has already begun. This also means that the resilience of the Filipinos is put to the test time and time again for as long as the Philippines has been situated in the typhoon belt.

Bearing the brunt, Filipinos struggle with poverty, life insecurity, and other existing inequalities which are aggravated by these natural calamities. In turn, this is made into man-made disasters due to the response (or lack thereof) of the government.

This is nothing new for traditional politicians and even the traditional media. Romanticizing or glorifying the resilience of the Filipinos in times of crisis is how they escape from accountability in the prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery spectrum of disaster.

Though the so-called ‘Filipino resilience’ is worthy of praise, there is a need to recognize that the Philippines would not be at high risk for disasters in the first place and that the adversities the Filipinos face can be prevented and mitigated.

If only the powers-that-be had done their job, Filipinos can struggle and survive any catastrophes. But more than that, only they can actualize their full potential, assert their self-determination, and reclaim resilience.

Photo courtesy of Corazon Jasa_3.jpg

Struggling through the storms

 

Fifty-three-year-old Cabangan resident Corazon Jasa says it is hard to provide for her family of five when storms hit their area.

“Dito po kasi, kapag po tag-ulan, taghirap po talaga. […] Katulad po kapag binabagyo, yung mangingisda ‘di po makalaot. Kami po na walang motor, literal na nakikibuhat lang ng bangka para meron po sanang libre maiulam,” Mommy Cora recounted her experience.

 

(Here, when it is in the rainy season, it really is a struggle. When storms enter our region, our fisherfolks cannot go to the sea. Our family has no motor and we only borrow boats so that we can have free meals.)

The municipality of Cabangan, Zambales has seen a rising trend in its resiliency—reaching 185th place among third and fourth municipalities in 2021, as measured by the Cities and Municipalities Competitive Index of National Competitiveness Council Philippines.

This does not mean that the said data reflects real-life situations on the ground. The fourth-class municipality of Cabangan has fisherfolk families and residents who live in hand-to-mouth existence and are one storm away from going hungry.

Mommy Cora described the usual situation when typhoons hit their area: “Halos karamihan po dito sa amin sa tuwing sasapit ang tag-ulan, lalo na po kung binabagyo po kami. Halos ‘di po kami makapagtrabaho o makahanap ng aming kakainin sa araw-araw. Pinipilit po namin na pumunta kami sa bukid o ilog para po makahanap man lang na pwede namin makain o may kaunting maibenta man lang para po may maibili kami ng bigas, kape, asukal, at iba pa.(Almost all of the residents here, when the rainy season comes, cannot go to work. We are forced to go to the fields or rivers so we can find food we can eat or we can sell so that we can buy rice, coffee, sugar, and others.)

Mommy Cora is a housekeeper in Zambales and an active volunteer of Alon & Araw, a children’s non-profit organization in Cabangan, Zambales. Her husband is a construction worker. This rainy season, they expect to try to make ends meet for their three children.

Usually, she would brave the storms and wake up as early as 7:30 AM to work in a part of a borrowed land for extra income to eat something for the whole day.

“Sobrang hirap po pero kailangan gawin para lang po may makain po kami ng pamilya ko. [Sa bukid], mayroon din po nakukuhang palakang bukid o mga gagang suso na pwede naming ibenta. Uuwi po ako ng 4:30 ng hapon. Maghapong basa ng ulan [para lang] po may pambili na ulit kami ng kakainin naming pamilya,” Mommy Cora told Adversity Archive.(Our situation is really difficult but we need to do this so my family can eat. [In the field], we can get farm frog or snail which we can sell. I will go home at 4:30 in the afternoon. I am drenched all day only for my family so I can buy food for them)

To survive the next day, Mommy Cora says that they would depend on the relief goods, which consist of rice, canned goods, noodles, coffee, and sugar sachets, given by their local government unit. She would also join the clean-up drive initiated by Alon & Araw in exchange for extra food packs.

At the height of the pandemic, netizens took their disappointment and rage to social media calling for accountability from the government and putting an end to the glorification of being resilient.

 

This happened after four strong typhoons ravaged the country with typhoon Quinta in the Bicol Region and Southern Tagalog; typhoon Rolly in Catanduanes and other nearby provinces; typhoon Siony in Batanes; and typhoon Ulysses in the Metro Manila.

The demands resurfaced once again after super typhoon Odette ravaged the country wherein it was reported that the Visayas and Mindanao region was in a dire situation, with rescuers saying a baby was taken to a safe area by using a plastic bin.

The case for disaster justice

Disaster justice is a fairly new concept. For Disaster Researchers for Justice (DRJ), disaster justice is the principle that holds all vulnerable people should have equal access to the protections and benefits that they deserve which the state is held accountable for in order for the people to live safely and efficiently. 

 

In her 2020 study, Dr. Anna Lukasiewicz of the Australian National University described disaster justice as in many ways an extension of environmental justice, that in its essence environmental issues disproportionately impact communities with high poverty.

Lukasiewicz further described how the vulnerable and marginalized communities are more at risk at every stage of disaster management. Like Filipinos, Mommy Cora is met with difficulty to recover when disasters enter their region.

In that case, Mommy Cora would heavily rely on the help of Alon & Araw. She tells Adversity Archive that age does not matter in participating in the organization’s environmental projects amid the pressing environmental issues in her region.

The case for disaster justice

Disaster justice is a fairly new concept. For Disaster Researchers for Justice (DRJ), disaster justice is the principle that holds all vulnerable people should have equal access to the protections and benefits that they deserve which the state is held accountable for in order for the people to live safely and efficiently. 

 

In her 2020 study, Dr. Anna Lukasiewicz of the Australian National University described disaster justice as in many ways an extension of environmental justice, that in its essence environmental issues disproportionately impact communities with high poverty.

Lukasiewicz further described how the vulnerable and marginalized communities are more at risk at every stage of disaster management. Like Filipinos, Mommy Cora is met with difficulty to recover when disasters enter their region.

In that case, Mommy Cora would heavily rely on the help of Alon & Araw. She tells Adversity Archive that age does not matter in participating in the organization’s environmental projects amid the pressing environmental issues in her region.

The case for disaster justice

Disaster justice is a fairly new concept. For Disaster Researchers for Justice (DRJ), disaster justice is the principle that holds all vulnerable people should have equal access to the protections and benefits that they deserve which the state is held accountable for in order for the people to live safely and efficiently. 

 

In her 2020 study, Dr. Anna Lukasiewicz of the Australian National University described disaster justice as in many ways an extension of environmental justice, that in its essence environmental issues disproportionately impact communities with high poverty.

Lukasiewicz further described how the vulnerable and marginalized communities are more at risk at every stage of disaster management. Like Filipinos, Mommy Cora is met with difficulty to recover when disasters enter their region.

In that case, Mommy Cora would heavily rely on the help of Alon & Araw. She tells Adversity Archive that age does not matter in participating in the organization’s environmental projects amid the pressing environmental issues in her region.

Photo courtesy of Corazon Jasa_2.jpg

“Naeenjoy po kami kasi kahit papaano sa tanda ko pong ito [at sa] tagal ko na po rito. [Kumukuha] po kami ng mga basura na pwedeng i-recycle, […] katulad po ng mga sachet, sitsirya na plastic, […] at mga bote na plastic. [Nililinis] namin ito at binubukod din po namin […] nang sa ganoon po mabibigyan po [kami] ng mga food packs [na] nakakatulong din po sa amin sa pangangailangan dito po sa bahay, Mommy Cora explained.

(We enjoy [the activities], howsoever, despite my old age and the time that I had been here. We get trash that we can recycle, like sachets, plastic bags of junk food, and plastic bottles. We clean these things and segregate them. In this way, we would be given food packs which help us to survive.)

Last year, Alon & Araw said that when typhoon Fabian came and battered the Zambales region, the fisherfolk families and Cabangan residents experienced hunger for three consecutive weeks.

The organization also conducted a survey where the result showed that “low educational attainment and lack of alternative livelihoods outside of fishing are what hinder the financial stability [of the residents].”

Here, Lukasiewicz believed that disasters result from the unequal distribution of resources, rights, and political power. She also argued that disaster is a human rights issue given the right to life, health, and shelter. Lastly, she also asserted that it “generates injustices which demand accountability.”

In that context, disaster management should be concerned with justice.

To reclaim resilience

While non-government organizations, civil society organizations, the media, and even international governmental agencies have a role to play in disaster management, it is the principal duty of the government to ensure justice is being swiftly served in the wake of a disaster.

Lukasiewicz pointed out that the role of the government does not only end in responding to disasters. She said that the government also influences the political processes in which not only protections and benefits that the vulnerable people deserve but also the policies and reforms are being mobilized. Moreover, she also said that the rights and survival of vulnerable people are at stake.

The case for disaster justice in the Philippines has still a long way to go, and Mommy Cora is one of the many Filipinos who still, unfortunately, need to overcome the pitfalls of resilience to achieve disaster justice.

For now, she has only a simple wish: she wants to have sustainable work where it enables her and her family to get by on their daily expenses. Mommy Cora also hopes to get their own fish net so that they do not worry to borrow one anymore.

 

“[At higit sa lahat], sana nga po umunlad na po ‘tong lugar namin.” (More than that, I hope that our situation in the region will develop and progress.)

 

Ang Pagwawasto ng Katatagan: Ang Kaso ng Hustisyang Pangsakuna sa Pilipinas

Agosto 2, 2022

JS Vitor

Translated by Gabrielle Marie Camaymayan

Nagsimula na ang panahon ng tag-ulan. Ibig sabihin din nito, na muli na namang masusubukan ang katatagan ng mga Pilipino sa walang humpay na pananalasa ng bagyo dahil sa heograpikal na posisyon nito.

Dala ang pagdurusa, nilalabanan ng mga Pilipino ang kahirapan, kawalan ng kapanatagan sa buhay, at iba pang umiiral na hindi pagkakapantay-pantay na pinapalala ng mga natural na kalamidad na ito. Dahil dito, ito ay nagiging artipisyal na kalamidad dulot ng tugon (o pagkukulang sa tugon) ng gobyerno. 

Hindi na ito bago para sa mga tradisyunal na pulitiko at maging sa tradisyunal na midya. Ang pagluwalhati o pagpuri sa katatagan ng mga Pilipino sa panahon ng krisis ay ang kanilang paraan upang makatakas sa kanilang responsibilidad sa pagsugpo, paghahanda, pagtugon, at pagbangon sa sakuna.

Bagaman ang tinatawag na ‘Filipino resilience’ (o ang kakayahan ng mga Pilipino na agarang bumangon mula sa kahirapan at mapangwasak na mga kaganapan) ay karapat-dapat purihin, kailangang kilalanin na maaari pa ring hindi makaranas ng madalas na sakuna ang Pilipinas at na ang mga kahirapan na pinagdadaanan ng mga Pilipino ay kayang masugpo at mapagaan. 

Kung ginawa lamang ng mga makapangyarihan ang kanilang trabaho, ang mga Pilipino ay maaaring lumaban at malagpasan ang anumang kalamidad.

 

Ngunit higit pa rito, sila lamang ang maaaring makakamit ng kanilang buong potensyal, magpahayag ng kanilang sariling determinasyon, at magwasto ng kanilang katatagan.

Photo courtesy of Corazon Jasa_3.jpg

Ang paghahamok sa gitna ng unos

Sinabi ng limampu't tatlong taong gulang na residente ng Cabangan na si Corazon Jasa na mahirap para sa kanya ang pagtataguyod sa kanyang pamilyang may limang miyembro tuwing mayroong mga bagyong humahagupit sa kanilang lugar. 

“Dito po kasi, kapag po tag-ulan, taghirap po talaga. […] Katulad po kapag binabagyo, yung mangingisda ‘di po makalaot. Kami po na walang motor, literal na nakikibuhat lang ng bangka para meron po sanang libre maiulam,” ani ni Nanay Cora.

Nakakita ng pagtaas sa katatagan ang bayan ng Cabangan, Zambales—na umabot sa ika-185 na puwesto kabilang sa mga ikatlo at ikaapat na klase ng munisipalidad noong 2021, base sa pagsukat ng Cities and Municipalities Competitive Index of National Competitiveness Council Philippines.

Hindi ito nangangahulugan na ang nasabing datos ay sumasalamin sa totoong sitwasyon ng munisipalidad. Ang ikaapat na klase ng munisipalidad ng Cabangan ay mayroong mga pamilyang mangingisda at residente na halos walang sapat na pagkain o pera para mabuhay at isang bagyo lamang ang layo mula sa gutom.

Inilarawan ni Nanay Cora ang nakagawiang sitwasyon tuwing hinahagupit ng bagyo ang kanilang lugar: “Halos karamihan po dito sa amin sa tuwing sasapit ang tag-ulan, lalo na po kung binabagyo po kami. Halos ‘di po kami makapagtrabaho o makahanap ng aming kakainin sa araw-araw. Pinipilit po namin na pumunta kami sa bukid o ilog para po makahanap man lang ng puwede namin makain o may kaunting maibenta man lang para po may maibili kami ng bigas, kape, asukal, at iba pa.

Si Nanay Cora ay isang tagapangalaga ng bahay sa Zambales at boluntaryong naglilingkod sa Alon & Araw, isang non-government organization para sa mga bata ng Cabangan, Zambales. Ang kanyang asawa ay isang trabahador sa konstruksyon. Ngayong tag-ulan, nais nilang makaraos upang mataguyod ang kanilang tatlong anak. 

Kadalasan siyang gumigising ng 7:30 AM upang lakas-loob na harapin ang araw at magtrabaho sa isang parte ng lupa na kanyang hiniram nang sa gayon ay magkaroon siya ng pera para sa kanyang pagkain buong araw. 

“Sobrang hirap po pero kailangan gawin para lang po may makain po kami ng pamilya ko. [Sa bukid], mayroon din po nakukuhang palakang bukid o mga gagang suso na puwede naming ibenta. Uuwi po ako ng 4:30 ng hapon. Maghapong basa ng ulan [para lang] po may pambili na ulit kami ng kakainin naming pamilya,” kwento ni Nanay Cora sa Adversity Archive.

Upang makaraos sa susunod na araw, sinabi ni Nanay Cora na umaasa sila sa ayuda tulad ng bigas, delata, bihon, kape, at asukal na ibinibigay ng kanilang lokal na pamahalaan. Nakikiisa rin siya sa inisyatiba ng Alon & Araw na paglinis ng ating kapaligiran bilang kapalit ng dagdag na makakain. 

Sa kasagsagan ng pandemya, inilabas ng mga netizens ang kanilang sama ng loob at matinding galit sa social media upang manawagan sa gobyerno na magkaroon sila na pananagutan at wakasan na ang pagluwalhati sa pagiging matatag.

 

Nangyari ito matapos nanalasa ang apat na malalakas na bagyo sa bansa, kabilang dito ang bagyong Quinta sa Rehiyon ng Bicol at Timog Tagalog; bagyong Rolly sa Catanduanes at iba pang kalapit na lalawigan; bagyong Siony sa Batanes; at bagyong Ulysses sa Metro Manila.  

Muling lumitaw ang mga kahilingan para rito matapos ang pananalasa ng matinding bagyong Odette sa bansa kung saan iniulat na ang rehiyon ng Visayas at Mindanao ay nasa malalang sitwasyon. Ayon sa mga tagapagligtas, kinailangan na nilang dalhin ang isang sanggol sa kaligtasan gamit ang basurahan.

Ang Kaso ng Hustisyang Pangsakuna

Ang hustisyang pangsakuna ay isang bagong konsepto. Para sa Disaster Researchers for Justice (DRJ), ito ay ang prinsipyong pumoprotekta sa lahat ng mga taong mahihina upang makamit nila ang pantay na benepisyong nararapat na ibigay ng pamahalaan para ligtas silang mabuhay. 

Sa kanyang pag-aaral noong 2020, inilarawan ni Dr. Anna Lukasiewicz ng Australian National University ang hustisyang pangsakuna bilang isang karugtong ng katarungang pangkapaligiran, na sa esensya nito ay ang mga isyung pangkalikasan ay mayroong matinding epekto sa mga komunidad kung saan laganap ang kahirapan.

Karagdagang inilarawan pa ni Lukasiewicz kung paano mas lalong nalalagay sa panganib ang mga nasa laylayan ng lipunan sa bawat yugto ng paghahanda para sa kalamidad. Tulad ng ibang mga Pilipino, nahihirapang makabangon si Nanay Cora tuwing mayroong kalamidad sa kanilang rehiyon.

Dahil dito, lubos na umaasa si Nanay Cora sa tulong ng Alon & Araw. Sinabi niya sa Adversity Archive na hindi mahalaga ang edad pagdating sa paglahok sa mga proyektong pangkapaligiran ng organisasyon ngayong humaharap sa mga matinding isyung pangkapaligiran ang kanyang rehiyon.

Photo courtesy of Corazon Jasa_2.jpg

“Naeenjoy po kami kasi kahit papaano sa tanda ko pong ito [at sa] tagal ko na po rito. [Kumukuha] po kami ng mga basura na pwedeng i-recycle, […] katulad po ng mga sachet, sitsirya na plastic, […] at mga bote na plastic. [Nililinis] namin ito at binubukod din po namin […] nang sa ganoon po mabibigyan po [kami] ng mga food packs [na] nakakatulong din po sa amin sa pangangailangan dito po sa bahay, paliwanag ni Nanay Cora. 

Noong nakaraang taon, sinabi ng Alon & Araw na nang hinagupit ng bagyong Fabian ang rehiyon ng Zambales, ang mga pamilya ng mangingisda at mga residente ng Cabangan ay nakaranas ng gutom sa loob ng tatlong magkakasunod na linggo.

Ang organisasyon ay nagsagawa din ng isang sarbey kung saan ang resulta ay nagpakita na ang “mababang pagtapos ng pag-aaral at kawalan ng alternatibong kabuhayan sa labas ng pangingisda ang siyang humahadlang sa pinansiyal na katatagan [ng mga residente]."

 

 

Dito, naniniwala si Lukasiewicz na ang mga sakuna ay resulta ng hindi pantay na pamamahagi ng mga risorses, karapatan, at kapangyarihang pampulitika. Nangatuwiran din siya na ang kalamidad ay isang isyu sa karapatang pantao na kaugnay ang karapatan sa buhay, kalusugan, at tirahan. Panghuli, iginiit din niya na ito ay "bumubuo ng mga kawalang-katarungan na nangangailangan ng pananagutan."

Sa kontekstong ito, ang paghahanda para sa kalamidad ay dapat kaugnay ng hustisya.

Ang pagwawasto ng katatagan

Bagama't ang mga non-government organizations, organisasyon para sa lipunang sibil, midya, at maging mga internasyonal na ahensya ng pamahalaan ay may papel na ginagampanan sa paghahanda para sa kalamidad, pangunahing tungkulin ng gobyerno ang tiyakin na mabilis na naibibigay ang hustisya sa panahon ng sakuna. 

Ipinunto ni Lukasiewicz na ang tungkulin ng gobyerno ay hindi lamang nagtatapos sa pagtugon sa mga kalamidad. Sinabi niya na naiimpluwensyahan din nito ang mga prosesong pampulitika kung saan hindi lamang ang proteksyon at benepisyo na nararapat sa mga nasa laylayan ng lipunan kundi pati na rin ang mga patakaran at reporma ay naaapektuhan. Bukod dito, sinabi rin niya na ang mga karapatan at kaligtasan ng mga nasa laylayan ng lipunan ay nakataya.

Ang kaso ng hustisiyang pangsakuna ay kailangan pang pabutihin at si Nanay Cora ay isa sa maraming Pilipino na, sa kasamaang-palad, ay kailangang lampasan ang kahirapan ng pagiging matatag upang makamit ang hustisiyang pangsakuna. 

Sa ngayon, simple lang ang hiling niya: gusto niyang magkaroon ng pangmatagalang trabaho na kayang suportahan ang kanyang pamilya sa kanilang mga pang-araw-araw na gastusin. Umaasa rin si Nanay Cora na makakuha ng sariling lambat para hindi na nila kailangan alalahanin ang paghiram sa iba. 

“[At higit sa lahat], sana nga po umunlad na po ‘tong lugar namin.”